Be a Happier (Business) Person

The National Association of Realtors publishes a pretty cool magazine, and I get weekly emails from them, with featured articles of interest to Realtors. This one struck me, because it applied not just to business, but to everyday life as well. The article cited six tips to being happier in general. Here it is:

1) Stay positive.

“Bad things happen to everyone, including happy people,” writes Travis Bradberry, co-writer of “Emotional Intelligence 2.0” and co-founder of TalentSmart. “Instead of complaining about how things could have been or should have been, happy people reflect on everything they’re grateful for.” Happy people tend to find the best solution to a problem and then move on, refusing to dwell on negative events.

2) Surround yourself with the right people.

You’ll build confidence and stimulate creativity by surrounding yourself with other upbeat people. Negative people, on the other hand, can zap away your energy.

3) Exercise more.

Even moving for as little as 10 minutes can help release a neurotransmitter that helps soothe your brain and keep you in control over your impulses. Schedule regular exercise into your daily life.

4) Slow down.

Don’t be so caught up in a routine that you forget to appreciate the little things in life. Enjoy a conversation or take a step outside to enjoy a fresh breath of air.

5) Have deep conversations.

Avoid gossip, small talk, and judging others. Have meaningful interactions by engaging with others on a deeper level and seek to build an emotional connection, Bradberry writes.

6) Help others.

Employees who helped others were 10 times more likely to be focused at work and 40 percent more likely to get a promotion, according to a study conducted by Harvard University. Those helping employees also were more likely to be happy during stressful times. “As long as you make certain that you aren’t overcommitting yourself, helping others is sure to have a positive influence on your mood,”

Sound advice … onward and upward!  :-))

Best Landlord Practices

It’s a competitive market out there. How do you attract and — more importantly — keep great tenants? For me, there’s a simple answer: show them you care about them and the home they’re renting. Here are some things I try to do on a regular basis:

  • Make sure every unit is clean and in great, working condition before showing to prospective tenants. I always supply shower curtains, toilet paper, and entry rugs for “starters.”
  • Maintain the exterior of the home. Trim bushes, pull weeds, paint when necessary. When your tenants see you taking care of the outside, they’ll be more likely to take care of the inside!
  • Tell your new tenants about the positive points of the neighborhood — locations of parks, schools, grocery stores, etc.
  • Review all points in the lease and make sure they understand and agree with how you run your business.
  • Be available to the tenants. I respond quickly to every call and text during my waking hours. This sets me apart from other landlords or management companies who are lax about returning calls.
  • Take care of repair issues promptly. Again, I try to get someone on the repair the same day if at all possible, which shows my tenants I care about them.
  • Let them know you appreciate them! Every year at Christmas, I deliver a small (food) treat to each of my tenants, and wish them a wonderful holiday season.

Some of my tenants have been with me for years, and I love it when my good tenants refer other good tenants to me. When you treat people fairly and with kindness (not leniency — there’s a difference!) they often return that favor. The Golden Rule lives on ……

HUD News ….

Elizabeth Gibson at EZ Landlord Forms contacted me with this somewhat alarming news from HUD, so thought I’d share her article with other landlords who might be impacted by the effects of what’s written/implied in this proposed rule change:

proposedfederalrulechangehaslandlordsfeelinganxious

Every quality rental property owner upholds the fair housing and anti-discrimination guidelines espoused by HUD, and makes those clear to tenants who rent from them. But making discriminatory actions (by tenants) the responsibility of the landlord seems unfair and unrealistic …

Definitely an issue that needs to be followed!